logo - Join me in the 1900s early C20th
Florence Cole as a child

Price cards in shops
before decimalisation

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Because each shop only sold one general type of ware, shops needed to attract customers who might otherwise just be passing by. So prices were displayed on the goods in the windows.

Similarly once customers were inside buying one thing, the shopkeepers needed to attract them to buy other things by putting the prices on their counter goods.

Price-display cards were quite large - perhaps of a size between that of a child's and an adult's hand - and the currency was the pre-1971 non-decimal pounds-shillings-and pence system. The following photographs show samples of price-display cards as they appeared in the early to mid 1900s.They were taken in a range of museums.

See the separate page on how these prices would have been pronounced.

shop price card from early 1900s, showing the old l-s-d currency: 2d, ie twopence, pronounced tuppence.
shop price card from early 1900s, showing the pre-1971 non-decimal currency 5d, ie fivepence
shop price card from early 1900s, showing the pre-1971 l-s-d currency 8d, ie eightpence
shop price card from early 1900s, showing the pre-1971 l-s-d currency 10d, ie tenpence
shop price card showing the pre-1971 l-s-d currency 1 shilling. A shilling had a great deal of buying power in the early 1900s.
shop price card showing the pre-1971 l-s-d currency: 1 shilling and 8 pence - a great deal of buying power in the early 1900s.
shop price card showing the pre-1971 l-s-d currency 3 shillings - a great deal of money in the early 1900s and almost certainly comes from much later in the century when inflation had taken it toll
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