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The webmaster, Pat Cryer, as a young child

Train lavatories in 1940s
war-time Britain

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Lavatory cubicle at the end of a corridor of an old train

Lavatory cubicle at the end of a corridor on an old train. Photographed on a Swanage Heritage Line train.

Some carriages of corridor-trains had lavatories, situated at the end of the carriage. The cubicles were made or faced with dark wood, as was so much in the era before man-made materials.

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Why the train lavatories were to be avoided

The lavatories always seemed to smell, were usually out-of-order, and were to be avoided if at all possible. This state of affairs went on for some years after the war as Britain did not recover quickly.

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The contents of passengers' visits

The contents of passengers' visits flushed directly onto the train lines. So - not surprisingly - there were notices inside the lavatories saying that the lavatories were not to be used while a train was in a station.

Notice inside the lavatory of an old train, requesting passengers to refrain from using the lavatory while the train is in a station.

Notice inside the lavatory of an old train, requesting passengers to refrain from using the lavatory while the train is in a station. Photographed on a Swanage Heritage Line train.

The lavatories locked with a bolt.

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The window as a train lavatory

Many of the trains were just compartments with no corridors. They were intended for short local journeys, but with the deprivations of the Second World War, this was not always possible. So some long distance trains had no lavatories. Other trains had broken ones, and sometimes they were occupied for long periods.

A ditty about train lavatories sung in WW2 forces

My apologies that I can't remember all the words, but I do remember that the following ditty was sung to a classical tune.

Passengers are please requested to refrain from passing water
When the train is in the station, I love you.
We encourage constipation when the train is in the station
.... I love you.

Kath O'Sullivan (formerly Margerison)
North District Signal Corps,
*The Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS)
Army number W 307782

Most passengers just put up with it somehow, but there was another solution - for men, but not women - see the boxes.

On a long journey in 1945 I was with two other ATS* girls in a train with no corridor and hence no lavatory. In our carriage were three young sailors full of beer, and one needed relief. So the sailors opened the window and shoved their tipsy mate to the opening. Then because there were girls were present, they held a great coat over his back so we could not see. In that way he was able to pee out of the open window.

Kath O'Sullivan (formerly Margerison)
North District Signal Corps,
*The Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS)
Army number W 307782

One time I took the night train to London amid an enormous number of sailors who were going on shore leave after their ship had paid off at Plymouth. As they had had much of the day to celebrate and were flush with pay, they had had their full of drinking and were sitting, standing, singing, arguing, shouting and moving up and down the packed corridors.

At one point, a very indignant sailor came along the corridor fulminating at the ticket inspector. It turned out that the sailor had needed to drain his bladder and the lavatory had been 'Engaged'. However he found that by standing on tip toe he could carry out the operation through the open window of the train door outside the lavatory.

If you can add anything to this page or provide a photo, I would be pleased to hear from you.

Pat Cryer
webmaster

While busying himself in this way, the ticket inspector came through the corridor connector, put his hand on the sailor's shoulder and pulled him back down onto his feet. The result was that the sailor ended up with a very wet front to his carefully pressed bell bottoms*.

Malcolm Keen

*The loose trousers that sailors wore were informally known as 'bell bottoms'.

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